For the Greater Goods

A lifestyle blog for the conscious consumer


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Friday Finds

Check out what I’ve been checkin’ out this week…

I’ve got some videos that will make you think and rethink the way you think… I think.

Friday Finds 5.22.15

1. A shocking reminder to treat everyone and thing with kindness. Click here if you’re inspired to make a difference.

2. How “plastic” is your brain? Think you could ride a backward bike?

3. Meet Mr. W. He’s lost, lonely, a bit obnoxious, and totally misunderstood until someone’s decided to focus on the good in Mr. W .


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Splurge or Save: Stacks on Stacks on Stacks

Now that the weather is (sometimes) warm enough to bare my wrists and arms while wearing a tee shirt, I’ve been really into stacking dainty bracelets. I’ve enjoyed experimenting with different stacks and while I’m no master, I like to have fun with it. But as I was looking for some dainty bracelets to add to my collection, I realized I am fairly boring when it comes to my stacking game. Most of what I own is gold chains or bangles. So I’ve made it my goal to mix up colors, textures, and metals to make a more interesting stack. I’ve got to diversify my portfolio, right?

I have picked out two similar, stackable bracelets at different price points that are socially conscious and will add a little pop of color to your wrist. Stylistically speaking these two bracelets are extremely similar. Both have a colorful, adjustable band with a metal bar centered in the middle. The materials and prices are what set these two apart.

Dogeared balance blue leather bracelet

The first and more expensive bracelet is from Dogeared, which you can buy here. The founder of Dogeared, Marcia Maizel-Clarke, believes jewelry could be both beautiful and meaningful. All of the jewelry is designed and hand crafted in the spirit of love, kindness, and consciousness out of their Southern California Studio. Dogeared is a certified B Corporation. Don’t know what a B Corporation is? Check out this video (it probably explains it better than I can). Basically, they’re all about creating, implementing, and sustaining ethical business practices.  Dogeared adheres to these standards by handcrafting everything locally, respecting the planet, and partnering with non-profit organizations that share their vision of a better world. While this bracelet won’t completely break the bank at $42, it is over twice as much as the other bracelet I’ve picked out.

Silver Bar Boarding 4 Breast Cancer

The next bracelet is by Pura Vida and can be purchased here. It is very similar to the Dogeared bracelet, but instead of leather, the band is made with string and only costs $15. The company started after the founders, Griffin Thall and Paul Goodman, took a trip to Costa Rica and fell in love with the pura vida (pure life) lifestyle. They met two men who were selling bracelets on the street and decided to take some of the jewelry back to sell in the U.S. The bracelets became very popular and blossomed into a business. Today Pura Vida provides jobs for artisans in Costa Rica. They also created the Charity Collection which gives back to charities all over the world through the sale of individual bracelets. The bracelet I have featured today gives $3 to Boarding for Breast Cancer.

So which do you chose? Will you splurge or save?

(Also as a sidenote: There is an adorable dog named Annie (just like yours truly) that needs YOUR help. If you saw my my recent Friday Finds, you might have read the story about Lola’s Lucky Day, which rescues dogs in Houston. Annie is their most recent rescue and needs an operation to have a tumor removed. So whether you have $2 or $200 bazillion to donate, please take the time to help any way that you can.)


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Monday Motivation

Because Mondays are hard and sometimes we need a little inspiration…

Adventure

I heard this quote a few weeks ago while I was on a bus to Boston. The documentary 180˚ South was playing and I was quickly enthralled in the story. A lot of things resonated when I heard this quote.  All too often when something goes wrong we see it as an annoying setback instead of a chance to grow and explore. So next time you find yourself adrift think of it as an exciting chance to discover something new about yourself and/or the world.

(180˚ South is available on Netflix if you are interested in watching it. I definitely recommend it.)


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Friday Finds

Check out what I’ve been checkin’ out this week…

Friday Finds 5.8.15

1. An inspiring read about finding your inner light. Really makes you think about what’s important in life.

2. The difference a sandwich can make. 

3. A moving story about rescuing dogs in Houston and how you can help homeless dogs. 


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Inspiring Individuals: Malala Yousafzai

This month’s Inspirational Individual is Malala Yousafzia. If you haven’t heard yet, last week ten people were sentenced to life in prison for their roles in the 2012 attack on Malala. And in other news, by some crazy coincidence, last week I also finished reading Malala’s book, “I Am Malala”. Honestly, it took me a while to get through this book. Not because I didn’t like it, but more because I dedicated most of my time this winter to watching Netflix instead of reading and being a real person. Over time I picked away at the book and learned something new each time I picked it up.

Malala 3

For those of you unfamiliar with Malala’s story, get your head out from under that rock. No, just kidding. I’ll give you a little background. Malala is from Pakistan’s Swat Valley, which she describes as a “land where rifles are fired in celebration of a son, while daughters are hidden away behind a curtain, their role in life simply to prepare food and give birth to children”. But Malala’s father was different than most and raised her just like he raised his son. He strongly encouraged his daughter to go to school, study hard, and plan for the future.

As you can imagine, many girls in Swat weren’t given the same opportunities as Malala. Many dropped out of school because they couldn’t afford it, their parents’ beliefs, or they were forced to get married. Things became worse for the girls in Swat when Talibanization spread through the valley and girls were told they should be forbidden at schools. The Taliban began bombing schools, killing teachers, and threatening students.

Although many girls became afraid to go to school, Malala never let fear get in the way of her education. She continued to go to a secret school with her books hidden under her shawl. She began giving speeches, radio interviews, and writing a blog for BBC about her experiences in Pakistan and the importance of accessible education for everyone. The Taliban later targeted and shot her for speaking out against them.

NORWAY-NOBEL-PEACE

Her book gives you a firsthand experience of how war and radicalized religion can sweep through and destroy a region. Malala also gives you a look at the culture of Pakistan. She has great pride in her country and openly shows you the good, bad, and everything in between. One thing that really struck me was how ‘normal’ she seemed. She reads “Twilight”, likes to sleep late, has fights with her younger brother, and gets stressed over exams. She also won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, but besides that, fairly normal.

There are also times throughout the book when it’s hard to believe she is just a teenager. Her book is so clearly articulated and promotes profound wisdom.  It is hard to believe she is only 16 when she drops incredible knowledge such as: “I’ve always been a daydreamer, and sometimes in lessons my mind would drift and I’d imagine that on the way home a terrorist might jump out and shoot me on those steps. I wondered what I would do. Maybe I’d take off my shoes and hit him, but then I’d think if I did that there would be no difference between me and a terrorist. It would be better to plead, ‘OK, shoot me, but first listen to me. What you are doing is wrong. I’m not against you personally, I just want every girl to go to school.’“. Her book is filled with inspiring tidbits like this.

There are so many lessons embedded in this book. Malala’s exuberantly positive outlook on life and sincere mission to promote accessible education are incredibly inspiring. I look forward to seeing what the future holds for this incredible young woman.

Malala 1